Sunday, 24 March 2019

Meeting 28 March 2019 - The Linwood Line’: Regional policy, deindustrialisation and a working life in a car factory in post-war Scotland

Our next meeting will be held on Thursday, 28 March 2019 at 7.30, in room D133, McLean Building, UWS. Paisley Campus. This room is accessed via the main entrance in High Street and will be signposted.

The speakers will be Dr Valerie Wright, Research Associate in Economic and Social History at the University of Glasgow and Mr Joe Riley a former worker at Linwood car factory. 

Guests are welcome, and we ask that they make a donation, suggested amount £3.00.

Please note the meeting will be proceeded by our AGM @ 7.00pm.

This evening’s meeting will be a collaborative endeavour. In December 2017 Joe kindly agreed to be interviewed on his experience of working in Linwood car factory for the University of Glasgow, Leverhulme Trust funded, project ‘Employment, Politics and Culture in Scotland: 1955-2015’. Valerie will begin the meeting by outlining why Linwood car factory was located in the West of Scotland and how its trajectory was shaped by global forces and economic circumstances. She will draw upon archival research and also on the oral history narratives provided by individuals participating in the project. Joe will then give an account of his experience working at Linwood drawing upon his memoirs entitled ‘The Linwood Line’ published recently in the Scottish Labour History Journal.

 Joe Riley worked at Linwood from 1971 until its closure in 1981. Joe became a shop steward at Linwood initially for the National Union of Vehicle Builders and later the Transport and General Workers Union. He was also a member of the Labour Party and became a councillor for Johnstone town centre and Johnstone Castle ward in 1972. Following the closure at Linwood, Joe became a self-employed gardener, but to improve his book-keeping and administration skills he went to college part-time. Joe also became a part-time youth worker in Ferguslie Park. He later completed full-time HNC and HND courses in leisure services management to improve his prospects in his work in leisure services for Glasgow City Council. Joe ended his career as a Community Facilities Officer in the Gorbals and Govanhill, but had worked in a variety of areas throughout the city managing services and working with the community. Joe retired in 2009.
Valerie Wright is a historian of modern Scotland with particular expertise in gender, social and political history. She is based in Economic and Social History at the University of Glasgow. Her current research as Research Associate working on the project ‘Employment, politics and culture in Scotland, 1955–2015’ focuses on the long-term effects of deindustrialisation in post-war Scotland. Previously she was employed as Research Associate on the project ‘Housing, everyday life and well-being over the long Glasgow 1950–1975’.

Friday, 8 March 2019

Meeting 14 March 2019 - Baker Street

Our next meeting will be held on Thursday, 14 March 2019 at 7.30, in room D133, McLean Building, UWS. Paisley Campus. This room is accessed via the main entrance in High Street and will be signposted.

Guests are welcome, and we ask that they make a donation, suggested amount £3.00.

Our speaker will be Andy Campbell from Paisley Community Trust, who will be updating us on the Baker Street project.

Sunday, 17 February 2019

Meeting 28 February 2019

Our next meeting will be held on Thursday, 14 February 2019 at 7.30, in room D133, McLean Building, UWS. Paisley Campus. This room is accessed via the main entrance in High Street and will be signposted.

Guests are welcome, and we ask that they make a donation, suggested amount £3.00.

The subject will be “Max Weber and Paisley: The case of the Coats Family of Paisley - 1899-1920”.

Our speaker will be Dr Kirsten Kinninmonth, Lecturer in Accounting/BAcc Admissions Officer at Glasgow University.

Sunday, 3 February 2019

The Pullingers, Arroll Johnstons and the Paisley Connection

Our next meeting will be held on Thursday, 14 February 2019 at 7.30, in room D133, McLean Building, UWS. Paisley Campus. This room is accessed via the main entrance in High Street and will be signposted.

The speaker will be Nina Baker on the above opic.

Guests are welcome, and we ask that they make a donation, suggested amount £3.00.

Nina has kindly provided the following information.

Biographical note:
Dr Nina Baker has had a varied career, largely in fields which have traditionally been male-dominated. On leaving school she became a merchant navy deck officer, serving for 7 years in tankers, and cargo ships. After a period abroad she returned to education and gained an engineering design degree and a PhD in concrete durability. Finding herself then in Glasgow with a young family she worked as an engineering research administrator in the various universities in the city. She was a Scottish Green Party Councillor on Glasgow City Council for ten years. Now fully retired, she amuses herself with engineering and construction history and in  particular with the stories of women in the history of engineering.

Summary of talk

This talk will reveal a largely forgotten segment of Paisley's engineering heritage: the early days of the Arrol Johnston automobile company and father and daughter team of Thomas and Dorothee Pullinger who took it from a small old fashioned not very successful factory to the most modern and go-ahead company of its era. Dorothee was the first woman to be inducted into the Scottish Engineering Hall of Fame and was a founding member of the Women's Engineering Society, whose centenary is this year.

Sunday, 13 January 2019

Why Archives Matter - 24 January 2019

Our next meeting will be held on Thursday, 24 January 2019 at 7.30, in room D133, McLean Building, UWS. Paisley Campus. This room is accessed via the main entrance in High Street and will be signposted.

The speaker will be John Phelan on the subject of Why Archives Matter.

Guests are welcome, and we ask that they make a donation, suggested amount £3.00.

John has kindly provided the following information.

Scotland’s archives are the documented memory of the nation. They tell our stories, enrich our lives, connect us with the past and give us a sense of identity. They may be used to provide evidence of our rights as individuals, organisations and communities and, through them, we can hold authorities to account. Archives can bring families and communities together by telling us who we are and where we come from. They are an antidote to fake news and ‘alternative facts’.

John Pelan, Director of the Scottish Council on Archives will talk about how Scotland’s archives not only provide the bedrock of society but offer an incredible resource of material for use in a wide range of situations and environments.  They can be used to promote mental wellbeing by building confidence and helping people with dementia. They attract visitors and boost the economy by supporting ancestral tourism. They underpin every aspect of education, science, health, culture, law and the historic environment.


Monday, 12 November 2018

The Ladies A, B & C

Our next meeting will be held on Thursday, 22 November 2018 at 7.30, in room D133, McLean Building, UWS. Paisley Campus. This room is accessed via the main entrance in High Street and will be signposted.

The speaker will be Lil Brookes on the subject of The Ladies A, B & C. 

Guests are welcome, and we ask that they make a donation, suggested amount £3.00.

Lil has kindly provided the following information.

My background:

For past couple of years I have run my own small business called Gatekeeper Art.  I came to this after a sudden chronic illness which changed the way I see things and I decided to take a chance and follow my lifelong dream of being my own boss and trying to sell my work as an artist…both of which I am glad to say I have successfully done so far…!  I am a Social Sciences graduate of UWS or rather Paisley College of Technology when I was a student and also followed studies post graduate in Social History.  I worked for many years in vocational education as a training officer including some time as Education & Outreach Officer for West Dunbartonshire Museums based at Clydebank Museum.  For the past several years I have worked in community outreach with adults with mental health issues, older adults, adults with physical and learning disabilities.  I use heritage as the means to interact with these “hard to reach” groups and working in partnership with museums, libraries and a variety of community/ charity groups to build ways of using resources with the outcome of developing ways of learning from our shared heritage or enhancing wellbeing.  So in my small business I wear many “hats” as a business person; project manager; artist and social historian with a community practice…my motto…” keep calm and carry on”

Talk content:

The talk will cover the story of the research, development and delivery of this community heritage project called “The Ladies A, B & C” including the exploration of using sensory participation - what I call “sensing history” - as an integral part of the participatory project workshops.  At the end of the talk the short film made to record the project will be screened.  The talk will also expand on the projects aim to raise the profile of some of the “forgotten” women in Paisley and Renfrewshire’s Victorian/ Edwardian past and shine a light on their contribution to the shaping of our shared local heritage.  In the year of the centenary of women getting the right to vote this women’s heritage project was a celebration for a group of today’s women in Paisley and Renfrewshire of Jane Arthur, Mary Barbour, Margaret Glen Coats, Elisabeth Hodge Coats and Bertha Kerr Coats…the Ladies A, B & C

Social media for Gatekeeper Art:

Facebook:

Facebook/Gatekeeper Art

Twitter:

@gatekeeper_art

Friday, 2 November 2018

Scottish songwriters' identity

Our next meeting will be held on Thursday, 8 November 2018 at 7.30, in room D133, McLean Building, UWS. Paisley Campus. This room is accessed via the main entrance in High Street and will be signposted.

The speaker will be David Scott on the subject of Scottish songwriters' identity.

Guests are welcome, and we ask that they make a donation, suggested amount £3.00.

David Scott is a Senior Lecturer within the School of Media, Culture & Society at UWS delivering programmes on Commercial Music and Songwriting. The MA Songwriting programme is the only one of its kind in Scotland and recently developed a Scholarship in conjunction with Paolo Nutini. David is a well regarded and widely published composer and performer, about to release his 9th album with the group The Pearlfishers. His programmes for BBC Radio Scotland have spanned documentary series on film music, lyric writing and, most prolifically, Classic Scottish Albums. The related epic 30-episode podcast series will form the basis of David's talk for the PFS. He will look at the identity of the Scottish songwriter, particularly the ways in which Scottish musicians have filtered American forms, with a focus on Bert Jansch, Gerry Rafferty and Glasvegas.